our messy table

Category: Walnuts

walnut banana baked oatmeal

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Hello people! I tell you. I sat down to write this post a handful of times over the past month. And if I learned anything from that stream of failure, it is that sitting down to write after baby is bathed and wrestled into pajamas and read about 50 books (a mild exaggeration) then tucked sweetly into bed… after the dishes have been washed and dried and put away and all the odds and ends dispersed randomly throughout the day are set back in their places…. after my evening jog and shower and my cup of tea found its way warmly into my hands… sitting down to write put me to sleep. And I tell you, those were some very good nights of sleep.

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Today is Saturday. And baby is napping. And I probably should be doing other things. But I feel like being here.

That being said, this past month of blogging failures has taught me something quite valuable I wanted to share.

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Before my last post, I was beginning to feel increasingly strained in my day-to-day life. I felt distracted and mildly chaotic all the time, which can be stressful when you are trying to help a 22-month-old down a ladder or into his winter clothes. So I made a choice.

I wanted to allow myself the grace to be in-the-moment. I decided that if I had the time and energy to post a recipe, I would post. And if not, then I wouldn’t feel bad about it. Overall, I wanted to be more conscious of my time spent looking into a screen.

I didn’t cut myself off from staring into a screen. That didn’t seem very realistic. I just tried to be more conscious of that time. More disciplined.

This may seem like a no-brainer. But it was difficult for me to not feel that pull toward facebook in every free moment.

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While following through, something very nice happened.

I didn’t feel the rush to get here and record a proud moment. I tied my kid’s shoes calmly and watched his facial expressions as he examined a caterpillar and looked into his eyes when he talked to me. I made dinner more slowly. Spent more time outside with the three of us. Made new friends.

The crunch of leaves under feet seemed more clear and crisp. My dog seemed like less of a nuisance…

I felt at peace with myself.

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And overall, I learned that I do not need your attention to feel that my life experiences are meaningful.

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Understand that I am so grateful for your reading eyes. I love to write and hear your feedback, especially when you try our recipes. But my separation from this space, and even from social media and pinterest and other media-things I will forever love, made me feel more… I don’t know… mentally stable. Less anxious and strained. More observant of my family and the precious time we have.

I don’t want to contribute to the mass of eyes fixed on glowing screens. I want to encourage everyone to do much less of that. I want our eyes to be on our little ones… even if they are just playing or sleeping. I want our eyes looking into the faces of our friends while talking over coffee. I want them staring out the window, finding all the fall colors in one tree.

That is not to say that writing here is futile. Or that I am old-fashioned (well, maybe a little). All I am asking is that we pay better attention to what is around us. Talk to your neighbor. Make a connection with someone new. I promise… it’s more interesting, more clear, more beautiful than whatever is happening here.

But, you, know. With a grain of salt. The recipe I am about to share is pretty kick-butt.

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My son and I are all about oatmeal. I pack oatmeal with yogurt and honey every morning for his day care breakfast. And on Saturday mornings, after my husband has left for work, my son routinely pushes a chair to the counter and we get busy with some kind of baked oatmeal. Last Saturday, our breakfast involved toasted walnuts and bananas. It filled our house with the smell of warm cinnamon and honey. Each mouthful tasted like amazingly textured banana bread. The recipe made quite a lot for two, so we were able to store it for future breakfasts and served it with yogurt for quick snacks. We hope you love it as much as we did.

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Banana Walnut Baked Oatmeal

Yield 6-8 servings

• 2 cups rolled oats
• ½ cup pumpkin seeds, toasted and cooled
• 1 cup walnuts, toasted, cooled and coarsely chopped
• 3 Tablespoons ground flaxseed
• 1 teaspoon baking powder
• 1 ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
• ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
• 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
• 1 ½ cups whole milk
• ½ cup buttermilk
• ½ cup applesauce
• 1/3 cup honey or maple syrup, plus more for serving
• 1 large egg, beaten
• 1 Tablespoon vanilla
• 3 ripe bananas cut into ½-inch slices
• 3 Tablespoons coconut oil or butter melted, plus more for greasing pan
• Flaky sea salt (optional)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Grease an 8-inch square or pie dish with a little coconut oil or butter. Fully coat the bottom and sides.

In a large bowl, mix together oats, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, flaxseed, baking powder, spices and salt. Set aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together 1 cup of milk and the buttermilk, applesauce, maple syrup or honey, egg and vanilla. Add to the dry mixture and fold quickly until just combined. You don’t want to stir too vigorously because you will break up the oats and they will become mushing when baked.

In the prepared dish, spread an even layer of sliced bananas (about 2 bananas). Then evenly spoon half the mixture on top of bananas. Top with remaining bananas and then the rest of the oat mixture. Pour remaining ½ cup milk on top and drizzle with coconut oil. The mixture will seem really wet at this point. Don’t worry. The oats will soak it up.

Bake until oatmeal is bubbly and has a golden top, about 40 minutes. Let cool for at least 15 minutes before serving to allow the oatmeal to set. Serve warm and drizzle with honey or maple syrup and falky sea salt. Cover and refrigerate leftovers for 4 to 5 days,

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surely

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We are a bit late this year. But finally, our garden had been planted.

We had an incident with our starters (they… um… blew away), and our tiller (it… uh… broke) and then there was the issue of where to plant the garden. We are due to move from our rental home at the end of this month. The question, “where to” still begs an answer. But we needed a garden, I declared. We needed fresh vegetables and something constructive to do under the sun. I wanted my son’s little hands to be busy picking beans and watering tomatoes and nurturing things to life. So, my parents were kind enough to let us use their yard for our mass of summer squash, winter squash, beans, dark greens, tomatoes and peppers. We planted carrots and beets in pots, and our herbs rest along the window sill, safety in my kitchen, away from the maddening winds of Iowa.

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We are treading through a transitional time, which isn’t a comfortable process for me. I like change. But the act of changing throws me off. It makes me feel unstable. Like the ground my feet were planted firmly, the ground that I trusted, split into earthy plates and drifted mysteriously away.

After spending the fall, winter and spring babysitting another little boy, my son and I are home alone for the summer. I have been taking advantage of the flexible time, the ability to just pick up and go. But  my son and I miss his play mate. And I miss the predictable routine we had wrapped ourselves into.

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Also, I plan to go back to school full-time in the fall. I have arranged for a babysitter and have been connecting dots and jumping through the hoops that school and life require. I feel excited and ready, but unsteady at the same time. I want the hoops to be lower. The dots to be closer together. And I want immediate answers to the lingering questions only time can answer.

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. . .

I have been thinking a lot about place lately. How the place you chose to live shapes you.

It is clear that my nearly 18-month-old has lived most of his life surrounded by open space. He knew every farm animal sound before he could talk. When he plays outside, the 30 mph wind flapping around his hair and clothes like desperately floundering fish hardly phases him. To him, large bodies of water are astonishing. Boats are mysterious-looking trucks. And probably, mountains are a little scary.

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I know my son will love this garden. And I am really grateful we don’t have to explain the concept of “moving” to him yet. He is still so resilient. So resourceful. And all he needs are my arms to know where home is.

I want to be more like that… you know, more trusting. More resilient. I want to believe home is where the three of us are together. And I think I am getting there. Slowly. But surely.

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. . .

I am pretty addicted to these lentils. I have made them approximately 4 times in the last 2 weeks… wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla, spread over my favorite and easiest bread recipe, and straight from the fridge. My son likes to eat them with a spoon alongside me, but due to the choking hazard, I make sure to leave the walnuts out of his portion.

Lentils folded into Yogurt, Spinach, and Basil

  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, chopped to the size of lentils
  • 2 cups baby spinach or arugula
  • 1 cup fresh basil leaves
  • 1 cup cooked lentils
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 cup Greek or plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • fine grain sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, shaved

With a sharp knife, gently slice the spinach and basil leaves into bite-sized pieces without bruising them. Otherwise, tear by hand.

Place the lentils in a bowl and mix in the spinach and basil. Squeeze the lemon into the lentils (mindful to omit the seeds), mix, and then fold in the yogurt. Mix again, and then pour in the olive oil, stirring, as you do, to combine. At this point, taste the mixture, and season with salt, and two good grindings of pepper. Finally, fold the nuts into the dish, and finish with a drizzle of oil.

The lentils and greens will keep in an airtight jar in the refrigerator for at least three days.

When you’re ready to assemble, bring the lentil mixture to room temperature. Give it a taste, and adjust with more salt or some lemon juice. It can go on toasted bread, in a wrap, over salad or plain. Finish with some Parmesan shavings.